College of Arts & Sciences

Date of Award

Winter 12-2009

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Spencer K. Thompson, Ph.D.

Second Advisor

Crystale Marsh-McDonald, Ph.D.

Third Advisor

Shirley Davenport

Abstract

Past research suggest differences in racial group’s perceived experiences in traumatic situations and different ways of coping can affect individual levels of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. The author examined how race, methods of coping and risk/resilience factors interact with PTSD symptomology. A total of 28 Black, Hispanic and Non Hispanic Caucasian Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) veterans were assessed for PTSD symptoms, methods of coping and risk/resilience factors related to deployment. Findings indicate no significant differences for minorities and non Hispanic Caucasians on level of PTSD symptoms. Findings indicate significant differences between minorities and non Hispanic Caucasians on deployment factors and coping mechanisms, as well as significant differences between genders on deployment factors and coping skills.

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