College of Arts & Sciences

Date of Award

Spring 5-2012

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

James Olson, Ph.D.

Second Advisor

Spencer K. Thompson, Ph.D.

Third Advisor

Crystale Marsh-McDonald, Ph.D.

Abstract

This study examined the usage patterns of nondrug alternatives and obtained knowledge that will be beneficial to future drug abuse prevention and rehabilitation in college students. The purpose was to identify the specific nondrug/drug alternatives used to alter mood by non-Hispanic Whites and Hispanics. Analysis revealed that engaging in discussion with spouse/friends was used most frequently to alter mood. The overall distribution of drug alternatives and nondrug alternatives differed significantly from chance in 72 participants. Further pair-wise analyses found there were significant differences between five drug and nondrug alternatives endorsed by non-Hispanic Whites and Hispanics. In conclusion, it was found that Non-Hispanic Whites engage in discussion with spouse/friend to alter mood more frequently than Hispanics. Hispanics engaged in personal contemplation more frequently than non-Hispanic Whites due to their cultural background.

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