College of Arts & Sciences

Date of Award

12-1999

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Behavioral Science

First Advisor

Spencer K. Thompson, Ph.D.

Second Advisor

Kay E. Ketzenberger, Ph.D.

Third Advisor

Robert Bartsch, Ph.D.

Abstract

This thesis project examined the effects of the lack of privacy and congregational intrusion on femilies in the ministry. It was expected to find marital well-being related to privacy level within the home and congregational intrusiveness. It was also expected to find differences between ministers and their wives on reported Privacy and Intrusion scales and the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS), specifically, women reporting more congregational intrusiveness, less privacy, and less marital satisfaction. The participants were 26 couples; comprised of a full-time, ordained, male clergy of Protestant churches (Baptist, n = 12, Methodist, n = 8, Church of Christ, n = 6) and a non-clergy spouse, with at least one child living at home. The mean age for the ministers was 41.3 years, and for the females was 40.0 years. Faimlies selected had been active in the ministry for 3 to 28 years, with the minimiim set at 3 years. The rese^cher contacted the volunteers via the telephone and solicited their participation. A brief information sheet was completed, and later the DAS, and a newly created Intrusion scale and Privacy scale was sent to the volunteers. Results indicated women who reported less privacy within the home also reported less marital satisfaction. No other significant relationships were found. No significant differences were found between reported male and female scores on any of the scales, or when examining scores as couples and splitting the sample into high and low groups. Implications of this research are increased understanding of the “glass house” effect, and wives perception of decreased marital satisfaction.

Share

COinS